Fennel Seed Vs Cinnamon: 3 Powerful Compounds Turn The Tables

Are you ready to dive into the Fennel seed vs Cinnamon discussion? Here we will take a closer look at fennel seed and cinnamon, and how these popular spices have been used for centuries for their medicinal properties. You will learn more about their digestive benefits and their ability to help with gut health and parasite cleansing.

While fennel seed is a common ingredient in many cuisines, cinnamon, specifically Cinnamomum verum, is often used in various forms such as powder, sticks, and oil.

Fennel seed has been used for centuries as a digestive aid, helping to reduce bloating, gas, and even cramps. It is also believed to have anti-parasitic properties that can help cleanse the gut. 1

On the other hand, cinnamon has been shown to have anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial properties that may also help improve gut health and fight off parasites. 2

Both fennel seed and cinnamon have unique properties that make them beneficial for gut health and a parasite cleanse.

However, it is important to note that while they can be used as natural remedies, they should not be used as a substitute for medical treatment where this is necessary. There are pre-existing medical condition considerations that need to be made, not limited to taking any medications.

Let’s get straight into the Fennel seed vs Cinnamon topic!

Fennel Seed vs Cinnamon; What are the Differences?

Fennel Seed

Fennel seed is an aromatic spice that comes from the fennel plant, which is native to the Mediterranean region. It has a sweet licorice-like flavour and is commonly used in cooking, particularly in Mediterranean and Indian cuisine.

Fennel seeds are small and oval-shaped, and they have a greenish-brown colour. They are often used as a digestive aid and have been used for centuries in traditional medicine for various ailments. 3

Fennel seeds are rich in nutrients such as vitamin C, calcium, magnesium, potassium, and manganese. We will go deeper into the nutritional content a little later.

They also contain powerful plant compounds that have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antimicrobial properties. These compounds include:

  1. Anethole
  2. Fenchone, and
  3. Estragole.

These compounds are responsible for the distinct flavour and aroma of fennel seeds.

Cinnamon

Cinnamon is a spice that comes from the inner bark of trees belonging to the Cinnamomum family. There are several types of cinnamon, but the most commonly used is Cinnamomum verum, also known as Ceylon cinnamon or “true cinnamon”.

Cinnamon has a warm, sweet flavour and is commonly used in baking and cooking. It is also used in traditional medicine for various health benefits.

Fennel-Seed-Vs-Cinnamon-harvesting-cinnamon-bark
Fennel Seed vs Cinnamon – Harvesting cinnamon bark

We have been using cinnamon in our homemade chai blend for years and the value we have been able to get from this humble bark has been more than aromatic.

Did you know that cinnamon is rich in antioxidants and has anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial properties? 4

It contains several bioactive compounds, including:

  • Cinnamaldehyde
  • Cinnamic acid, and
  • Cinnamate.

These are responsible for its health benefits. We will look more closely at these a little later in the article.

Fennel Seed vs Cinnamon for Parasite Cleansing

Let’s take a look at the powers of Fennel seed vs Cinnamon with the scope of application being parasite cleansing.

Fennel Seed

Fennel seeds are regarded as a natural remedy for parasites. They have been used for this purpose for centuries. They contain compounds that have anti-parasitic properties, such as anethole and fenchone. 5

Fennel seeds can help to expel parasites from the body and improve digestion. Here are some ways you may choose to use fennel seeds for a parasite cleanse:

  • Chew on a tablespoon of fennel seeds after meals to aid digestion and help prevent parasites from taking hold in the gut
  • Make tea by steeping a teaspoon of fennel seeds in a cup of hot water for 10 minutes. Drink this tea three times a day for a week to help expel parasites from the body, or
  • Add fennel seeds to your meals as a spice to help prevent parasites from taking hold in the gut. They work well in curries, stews, and soups.

In a previous article on Fennel seed vs Clove, we included an outline of how to make fennel tea.

Cinnamon

Recent studies have shown that cinnamon has anti-parasitic activity against various parasites such as: 6

  • Flagellates
  • Cryptosporidium parvum
  • Trichomonas gallinarum, and
  • Histomonas.
Fennel Seed vs Cinnamon - microorganism

On top of the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties previously mentioned that cinnamon has, the active compounds found in it, such as cinnamaldehyde, are effective against parasites by inhibiting their growth and reproduction. 7

If you are looking to do a parasite cleanse with cinnamon, there are a few ways to incorporate it into your diet. You can add cinnamon to your meals, smoothies, or tea. You can also take cinnamon supplements in the form of capsules or tablets.

Fennel Seed vs Cinnamon Considerations

It is important to note that while fennel seeds and cinnamon have been shown to have anti-parasitic properties, they should not be used as a substitute for medical treatment.

If you suspect you have a parasite infection, it is important to consult with a healthcare professional for proper diagnosis and treatment.

Fennel Seed vs Cinnamon Benefits, Side Effects, and Nutritional Values

Benefits of Fennel Seeds

Fennel seeds are rich in antioxidants and have anti-inflammatory properties that help in reducing inflammation in the gut. They are also rich in fibre, which helps in keeping the digestive system healthy and regular.

Fennel seeds are known to have antimicrobial properties, which help in fighting against harmful bacteria and parasites in the gut. 8

Fennel seeds are also known to have carminative properties, which help in reducing bloating and gas in the gut. They also help in reducing stomach cramps and nausea, making them an effective remedy for an upset stomach. 9

Side Effects of Fennel Seeds

Fennel seeds are generally safe for consumption, but some people may experience allergic reactions to them. In some cases, fennel seed side effects may include symptoms such as:

  • Nausea
  • Vomiting, and
  • Diarrhea.

It is important to consult a doctor before consuming fennel seeds for any purported medicinal purposes, especially if you are pregnant, breastfeeding, or taking any medications.

Benefits of Cinnamon

Cinnamon is known to have anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial properties, which help in reducing inflammation and fighting against harmful bacteria and parasites in the gut. It is also a rich source of antioxidants, which help in reducing oxidative stress in the body and promoting overall health.

Cinnamon is also known to have carminative properties, which help in reducing bloating and gas in the gut. 10

It is also known to help in regulating blood sugar levels, making it an effective remedy for people with diabetes. 11

Side Effects of Cinnamon

Cinnamon is generally safe for consumption, but some people may experience allergic reactions to it. In some cases, cinnamon may cause side effects such as:

  • Mouth sores
  • Skin irritation, and
  • Liver damage.

Like with fennel seeds, it is also important to consult a doctor before consuming cinnamon for anything other than culinary purposes, especially if you are pregnant, breastfeeding, or taking any medications.

Nutritional Values of Fennel Seed vs Cinnamon

Both of these herbs have specific nutritional values. The comparison between Fennel seed vs Cinnamon is easiest completed as a side-by-side evaluation. Let’s consider how they compare. 12 13

Nutritional Value per 100gCinnamonFennel Seeds
Vitamin C3.8 mg21 mg
Fibre5.31 g39.8g
Calcium1002 mg1196 mg
Copper0.34 mg1.067 mg
Zinc1.83 mg3.7 mg
Iron8.32 mg18.54 mg
Magnesium60 mg385 mg
Potassium431 mg1694 mg
Manganese17.46 mg6.53 mg
RDI per 100gCinnamonFennel Seeds
Sodium0.65%4%
Zinc16.6%33.67%
Copper38%118.67%
Calcium100.3%119.67%
Iron104%232%
Magnesium14.3%91.67%
Phosphorous9.3%69.67%
Potassium13%50%
Selenium1.3%0%
Vitamin B120%0%
Vitamin B612.33%36.33%
Vitamin B57.3%0%
Vitamin B38.3%38%
Vitamin B23.3%27.33%
Vitamin B12%34%
Vitamin C4.3%23.33%
Vitamin D0%0%
Vitamin E15.6%0%
Vitamin A9%3%
Vitamin K26%0%
Folate1.6%0%
Macronutrient ContentCinnamonFennel Seeds
Protein3.99g| 4%15.8g | 16%
Fats1.24g | ~1%14.87g | 15%
Carbohydrates80.59g | 81%52.29g | 52%
Water10.58g | 11%8.81g | 9%
Other3.6g | 4%8.23g | 8%
Fat ContentCinnamonFennel Seeds
Saturated Fats0.345 g0.48 g
Monounsaturated Fats0.246 g9.91 g
Polyunsaturated Fats0.068 g1.69 g
An overview of the nutritional value of Fennel seed vs Cinnamon

FAQs

What is Fennel Seed?

Fennel seed is the dried seed of the fennel plant, which is a flowering plant species in the carrot family. It has a licorice-like flavour and is commonly used in cooking and as a natural remedy for digestive issues.

What is Cinnamon (Cinnamomum verum)?

Cinnamon (Cinnamomum verum) is a spice derived from the inner bark of the Cinnamomum tree. It has a sweet and warm flavour and is used in cooking and baking and as a natural remedy for various ailments.

Can Fennel Seed and Cinnamon help with Gut Health?

Both fennel seed and cinnamon have been shown to have potential benefits for gut health.

Fennel seed has been traditionally used to treat digestive issues such as bloating, gas, and constipation. It contains compounds that have anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial properties, which may help reduce inflammation and fight off harmful bacteria in the gut.

Cinnamon has also been shown to have anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial properties, which may help reduce inflammation and fight off harmful bacteria in the gut. Additionally, cinnamon has been shown to have a positive effect on blood sugar levels, which may help improve gut health by reducing the risk of developing conditions such as type 2 diabetes.

Can Fennel Seed and Cinnamon help with Parasite Cleanse?

While fennel seed and cinnamon have been traditionally used as natural remedies for parasite cleansing, there is limited scientific evidence and research that has been completed to support their effectiveness. However, some studies have shown that cinnamon may have potential as an antiparasitic agent. More research is needed to fully understand the effects of fennel seed and cinnamon on parasite cleanse.

Conclusion

While both fennel seed and cinnamon have potential benefits for gut health and parasite cleansing, more research is needed to fully understand their effects.

As with any other natural remedy or product, it is important to consult with a healthcare professional before using fennel seeds or cinnamon for these purposes.

What are your thoughts on the Fennel seed vs Cinnamon discussion? Have you tried using these in things such as a cinnamon fennel seeds drink weight loss regime? And if so, what are your thoughts on fennel and cinnamon water benefits? Join the conversation on Instagram and Pinterest.

References

  1. “Antioxidant activity and phytochemical analysis of fennel seeds and flaxseed” – S. Noreen, T. Tufail, H. B. Ul Ain, A. Ali, R. M. Aadil, A. Nemat, M. F. Manzoor, 24 January 2023 [Wiley] [Archive] ↩︎
  2. “Cinnamon: A Multifaceted Medicinal Plant” – P. V. Rao, S. H. Gan, 10 April 2014 [PubMed] [Archive] ↩︎
  3. “Effects of dietary fennel (Foeniculum vulgare Mill.) seed powder supplementation on growth performance, nutrient digestibility, small intestinal morphology, and carcass traits of broilers” – H. Liu, J. Li, S. Lin, T. Liu, C. Zheng, 28 January 2021 [PubMed] [Archive] ↩︎
  4. “What are the health benefits of cinnamon?” – K. Marengo, Y. Brazier, 3 January 2020 [Medical News Today] [Archive] ↩︎
  5. “The hepatoprotective effects of fennel seeds extract and trans-Anethole in streptozotocin-induced liver injury in rats” – Z. S. Noshahr, M. A. R. Hadjzadeh, R. M. Marjaneh, A. K. Rad, 30 December 2020 [Wiley] [Archive] ↩︎
  6. “Ginger and Cinnamon: Can This Household Remedy Treat Giardiasis? Parasitological and Histopathological Studies” – A. Mahmoud, R. Attia, S. Said, Z. Ibraheim, October 2014 [PubMed] [Archive] ↩︎
  7. “Anthelmintic activity of trans-cinnamaldehyde and A- and B-type proanthocyanidins derived from cinnamon (Cinnamomum verum)” – A. R. Williams, A. Ramsay, T. V. A. Hansen, H. M. Ropiak, H. Mejer, P. Nejsum, I. Mueller-Harvey, S. M. Thamsborg, 30 September 2015 [Nature] [Archive] ↩︎
  8. “Effect of Foeniculum Vulgare Aqueous and Alcoholic Seed Extract against Zoonotic Cutaneous Leishmaniasis” – G. Mostafa, N. Jalallou, S. J. Seyyedtabaei, A. Dadashi, S. E. S. Sabour, 31 March 2021 [PubMed] [Archive] ↩︎
  9. “Handbook of Herbs and Spices, Volume 2” – K. V. Peter, 2012 [ScienceDirect] [Archive] ↩︎
  10. “Ethnopharmacological Uses and Public Knowledge Regarding Cinnamomum zeylanicum in Khobar, Saudi Arabia” – H. Almubayedh, R. Ahmad, A. A. Naqvi, N. Ahmad, July 2018 [PubMed] [Archive] ↩︎
  11. “The Effect of Different Amounts of Cinnamon Consumption on Blood Glucose in Healthy Adult Individuals” – N. Kizilaslan, N. Z. Erdem, 4 March 2019 [PubMed] [Archive] ↩︎
  12. “Cinnamon” – USDA Staff, 1 April 2019 [USDA] [Archive] ↩︎
  13. “Fennel seeds” – USDA Staff, 1 April 2019 [USDA] [Archive] ↩︎

Last Updated on 4 months by D&C Editorial Team

About the Author

Christine has long been on the path to optimal health. With a history of weight loss coaching she is driven by a passion for nutrition, health and wellness. Having grown up in Africa before migrating to New Zealand, and then Australia, she has seen very strong contrasts in quality of life and is driven to help others understand the importance of taking a holistic approach to life.

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