How To Use Shilajit

Before we look at how to use Shilajit, it is recommended that you first speak with your trusted Dietitian or Doctor about any changes you plan to make to your diet or regime.

Always get professional medical advice specifically tailored to your circumstances to make sure a change you are looking at is right for you. Once you have this advice, always administer any suggested supplements per the professional instructions you have been given.

As our Pure Shilajit Mineral Resin is provided in a thicker form, it is easy to dissolve a pea or rice grain sized portion into a liquid and then drink it.

My preference is to add this to a glass of room temperature water to avoid shocking the minerals and natural properties of the resin. This can then be topped up with warmer water to your liking.

Some people choose to add this to teas, such as a homemade chai, juices, milk, or even smoothies. I love using this is a number of ways with my Sea Moss.

Your choices are almost limitless. I have also heard from a few people who have chosen to use this in our Raw Red Velvet Cake also!

Most Ayurvedic practitioners will suggest using it once a day, with some suggesting that it can be used as many as three times a day. Typically, they are advising that this is somewhere between 300mg and 500mg daily.

Keep in mind that this is specific advice provided by a qualified practitioner who is consulting a person, normally face-to-face, not through a general information article, like this one.

We do not provide specific instructions here based on medical advice, we are not in a position to do so. We only offer information for you to consider based on our research and patterns of use in order to evaluate if this is something you wish to investigate further.

As mentioned earlier, please always ensure that you speak with your trusted Dietitian or Doctor before choosing to take Shilajit.

Something to keep in mind is that not everything is suitable for everyone. The rise in the number of cases of food allergies today is enough of an indication that your own considerations on the surface need to be made at the very least.

Shilajit and Vitamin C

Due to the acidic constituents found in this ancient resin, specifically Benzoic Acid, we do not choose to add this to anything with Vitamin C (Ascorbic Acid) in it.

The decarboxylation reaction between these two acids essentially results in the Benzoic Acid becoming Benzene. This is more of a predominant observation in processed foods than an immediate reaction. However, I choose to err on the side of caution here. [1, 2]

Are there concerns with Benzoic Acid in any other manner connected to it?

Not to the extent that it presents a risk that is noteworthy according to the studies. Attributed with having anti-microbial properties, it can play an effective role in supporting overall good gut health. [3, 4]

References

  1. “Effect of Shilajit on the heart of Daphnia: A preliminary study” – N. S. Gaikwad, A. V. Panat, M. S. Deshpande, K. Ramya, P. U. Khalid, P. Augustine, January 2012 [PubMed]
  2. “Benzene as a Chemical Hazard in Processed Foods” – V. P. Salviano dos Santos, A. M. Salgado, A. G. Torres, K. S. Pereira, 18 February 2015 [PubMed]
  3. “Benzoic Acid Used as Food and Feed Additives Can Regulate Gut Functions” – X. Mao, Q. Yang, D. Chen, B. Yu, J. He, February 2019 [PubMed]
  4. “Final report on the safety assessment of Benzyl Alcohol, Benzoic Acid, and Sodium Benzoate” – B. Nair, 2001 [PubMed]