Fennel Seed Vs Thyme: Parasite Reckoning 16 Amazing Compounds Uncovered

Come with us as we take a closer look at Fennel seed vs Thyme. These are two herbs that have been traditionally used for their medicinal properties. Both herbs have been known to have an amazing array of beneficial properties. Did you know that they are also regarded as having specific benefits for gut health and parasite cleansing?

Fennel seed has been used for centuries as a natural remedy for digestive issues. It is known to have anti-parasitic properties and can help eliminate harmful organisms from the gut. Fennel seed is also rich in fibre, which can help regulate bowel movements and promote overall gut health. 1

Thyme, on the other hand, is known for its antimicrobial properties. It has been used to treat various infections. Thyme has also been shown to have anti-parasitic effects and is understood to be effective in eliminating harmful organisms from the gut. 2

Let’s take a closer look at the comparison between Fennel seed vs Thyme.

Fennel Seed vs Thyme

Fennel seeds and thyme are two herbs that are commonly used in cooking and have been used for medicinal purposes for centuries. Fennel seeds come from the fennel plant, which is native to the Mediterranean region and is a member of the carrot family.

They have a licorice-like flavour and are often used in Mediterranean and Indian cuisine. They are also used in traditional medicine to aid digestion, relieve bloating and gas, and stimulate the appetite. 3

Thyme, on the other hand, is a perennial herb that is native to the Mediterranean and is a member of the mint family.

It has a strong, earthy flavour and is often used in Mediterranean and Middle Eastern cuisine. It is also used in traditional medicine to treat respiratory infections, sore throat, and digestive issues. 4

Of particular interest to these two herbs is their antimicrobial properties. These have been used in the past to help fight off harmful bacteria and parasites in the gut.

As you dig deeper into the Fennel seed vs Thyme research, you may be surprised to learn just how effective these two herbs are. They provide so much more functional value than simply adding to the flavour of foods.

Gut Health and Parasites

Gut health is crucial for overall well-being, and a healthy gut can help prevent parasitic infections.

Parasites can cause various symptoms, including diarrhea, abdominal pain, and weight loss. Therefore, it is essential to maintain a healthy gut to prevent parasitic infections. 5

Both Thyme and Fennel seeds contain compounds that have been shown to have anti-parasitic properties.

Compounds of Interest

Within the Fennel seed vs Thyme discussion, there are certain major and biologically important chemical constituents we will look at, and some that are present, but not considered in the same hierarchy. 6 7 8 9

Below is a snapshot of some of the compounds of interest.

CompoundProperties of InterestFennel Seed vs ThymeInhibited Microorganisms,
α-copaeneAnti-parasiticThymeStaphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli
thymolAnti-bacterial
Anti-parasitic
ThymeStaphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Escherichia coli, Cryptosporidium parvum
1,8 cineoleAnti-bacterialThymeStaphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Escherichia coli
borneolAnti-bacterialThymeStaphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Escherichia coli
CarvacrolAnti-bacterialThymeStaphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Escherichia coli
E-caryophylleneAnti-bacterialThymeStaphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Escherichia coli
α-terpineolAnti-bacterialThymeStaphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica
linaloolAnti-bacterial and Anti-fungalThymeEscherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Candida albicans
p-cymeneAnti-bacterialThymeEscherichia coli
γ-terpineneAnti-bacterialThymeShigella dysenteriae
Trans-anetholeAnti-bacterialFennel SeedSalmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotype Typhimurium
methyl chavicolAnti-bacterialFennel SeedSalmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotype Typhimurium
limoneneAnti-bacterialFennel SeedSalmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotype Typhimurium
anetholeAnti-microbialFennel SeedStaphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Salmonella
fenchoneAnti-microbialFennel SeedStaphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Salmonella
α-pineneAnti-microbialFennel SeedStaphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Salmonella
An overview of the properties of interest in Fennel seed vs Thyme

While both herbs have similar benefits, it is important to note that they work differently in the body. Fennel seed is known for its ability to improve digestion and relieve bloating, while Thyme is known for its antimicrobial properties and ability to fight off harmful bacteria and parasites.

Fennel seed vs Thyme
Fennel Seed vs Thyme – How effective are they at inhibiting microorganisms?

It is important to consult with a healthcare professional before using any herbs or supplements, especially if you have a medical condition or are taking medication.

Additionally, it is important to maintain a healthy diet and lifestyle to support gut health and prevent parasitic infections.

Fennel Seed for Gut Health and Parasite Cleanse

Like many of the comparison articles we have published, for me, the conversation here is not about one being better than the other. When it comes to Fennel seed vs Thyme, I choose to make sure there is a healthy balance of both in my diet.

Benefits of Fennel Seed for Gut Health

Research has also shown that fennel seed can help reduce symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), such as bloating, cramping, and gas. 10

It can also help relieve nausea and vomiting, making it a useful remedy for those experiencing digestive discomfort.

Benefits of Fennel Seed for Parasite Cleanse

Fennel seed has been traditionally used as a natural remedy for parasitic infections. It contains compounds that have been shown to have anti-parasitic properties, which can help eliminate harmful parasites and their eggs from the gut.

Research has also shown that fennel seed can help reduce inflammation and oxidative stress in the gut, which can help prevent the growth and spread of parasites.

Furthermore, the stimulation of digestion promotes the production of digestive enzymes, which can help break down and eliminate parasites from the gut.

How to Use Fennel Seed for Gut Health and Parasite Cleanse

Fennel seed can be consumed in a variety of ways to promote gut health and cleanse the body of parasites. Here are some ways to use fennel seed:

  • Add fennel seed to your meals as a spice or seasoning
  • Brew fennel seed tea by steeping 1 teaspoon of fennel seed in hot water for 5 to 10 minutes
  • Chew on fennel seeds after meals to promote digestion and freshen breath, or
  • Take fennel seed supplements in capsule form, following the recommended dosage on the label.

It is important to note that while fennel seed can be a useful remedy for gut health and parasite cleansing, it should not be used as a replacement for medical treatment.

If you suspect that you have a parasitic infection or are experiencing severe digestive symptoms, it is important to seek medical advice from a healthcare professional.

Thyme for Gut Health and Parasite Cleanse

Benefits of Thyme for Gut Health

Thyme (Thymus vulgaris) is a herb with many potential health benefits. It has been traditionally used as a digestive aid due to its carminative properties, which can help relieve bloating and gas. Thyme also has antimicrobial properties that may help reduce harmful bacteria in the gut.

Studies have shown that dietary supplementation of thyme oil may improve intestinal integrity, which could help prevent leaky gut syndrome.

Additionally, thyme extract has been found to have anti-inflammatory effects, which may help reduce inflammation in the gut and improve overall gut health.

Benefits of Thyme for Parasite Cleanse

Thyme has been traditionally used as a natural remedy for parasitic infections. It has been found to have antiparasitic properties, which may help kill or inhibit the growth of parasites in the gut.

Thyme may also help reduce the symptoms of intestinal parasites, such as cramping and diarrhea, due to its antispasmodic properties. 11

How to Use Thyme for Gut Health and Parasite Cleanse

Thyme can be consumed in various forms to help improve gut health and aid in parasite cleansing. Here are some ways to use thyme:

  • Steep fresh or dried thyme leaves in hot water for 5 to 10 minutes and drink as tea
  • Use fresh or dried thyme as a seasoning in your meals
  • Use Thyme essential oils as instructed by a Specialist, or
  • Consider taking Thyme supplements which are available in various forms, including capsules, tablets, and liquid extracts. Ensure that you follow the recommended dosage on the label per your Doctor’s instructions.

It is important to note that thyme should not be used as a replacement for medical treatment for parasitic infections. Consult with a healthcare professional before using thyme or any other natural remedies for parasitic infections.

Fennel Seed vs Thyme Comparison

While both Fennel seed and thyme have similar benefits for gut health and parasite cleansing, they differ in their specific properties and uses.

Both herbs can be used in various forms, including the previously mentioned teas, tinctures, and capsules. It is important to note that while these herbs have been traditionally used for their medicinal properties, more research is needed to fully understand their effectiveness and safety.

Nutritional Values of Fennel Seed vs Thyme

But it’s not just all about the cleansing potential of these herbs. They both have specific nutritional values too. The comparison between Fennel seed vs Thyme is easiest done as a side-by-side evaluation of the two. Let’s take a look at how they stack up against each other. 12 13

Nutritional Value per 100gThymeFennel Seeds
Vitamin A (RAE)283 µg7 µg
Vitamin C160.1 mg21 mg
Iron 17.45 mg18.54 mg
Copper0.55 mg1.067 mg
Zinc1.81 mg3.7 mg
Magnesium160 mg385 mg
Potassium609 mg1694 mg
Fibre14 g39.8 g
Calcium405 g1196 mg
Polyunsaturated Fat0.53 g1.69 g
RDI per 100gThymeFennel Seeds
Sodium0.67%4%
Zinc16.67%33.67%
Copper61.67%118.67%
Calcium40.67%119.67%
Iron218.33%232%
Magnesium38.33%91.67%
Prosperous15.33%69.67%
Potassium18%50%
Folate11.33%0%
Vitamin B120%0%
Vitamin B627%36.33%
Vitamin B58.33%0%
Vitamin B311.67%38%
Vitamin B236.33%27.33%
Vitamin B14%34%
Vitamin C178%23.33%
Vitamin D0%0%
Vitamin E0%0%
Vitamin A95.33%3%
Vitamin K0%0%
Macronutrient ContentThymeFennel Seeds
Protein5.56g | 6%15.8g | 16%
Fats1.68g | 2%14.87g | 15%
Carbohydrates24.45g | 24%52.29g | 52%
Water65.11g | 65%8.81g | 9%
Other3.2g | 3%8.23g | 8%
Fat ContentThymeFennel Seeds
Saturated Fats0.467 g0.48 g
Monounsaturated Fats0.081 g9.91 g
Polyunsaturated Fats0.532 g1.69 g
An overview of the nutritional value of Fennel seed vs Thyme

Did you know that Fennel seed along with Turmeric is one of the ingredients in Ultimate Fibre? We took a closer look at how these two stack up in a previous article that explored the Fennel Seed vs Turmeric Benefits.

FAQs

What is Fennel Seed?

Fennel seed is a spice that comes from the fennel plant, which is native to the Mediterranean region. It has a licorice-like flavour and is often used in cooking and herbal medicine. Fennel seed is known for its ability to aid digestion, reduce inflammation, and relieve gas and bloating.

What is Thyme (Thymus vulgaris)?

Thymus vulgaris is an herb that is commonly used in cooking and herbal medicine. It has a strong, earthy flavour and is known for its antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties. Thyme is often used to treat respiratory infections, digestive issues, and skin conditions.

What are the Benefits of Fennel Seed?

• Aids digestion
• Reduces inflammation
• Relieves gas and bloating
• May help lower blood pressure, and
• May help regulate menstrual cycles

What are the Benefits of Thyme (Thymus vulgaris)?

• Antimicrobial properties
• Anti-inflammatory properties
• May help relieve respiratory infections
• May help improve digestion, and
• May help treat skin conditions

Which is better for Gut Health: Fennel Seed or Thyme?

Both Fennel seed and Thyme have been shown to have benefits for gut health. Fennel seed is known for its ability to aid digestion and relieve gas and bloating, while Thyme has antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties that may help improve digestion and treat digestive issues. Ultimately, when it comes to Fennel seed vs Thyme, the best choice will depend on the individual’s specific needs and preferences.

Can Fennel Seed and Thyme be used together?

Yes, Fennel seed and Thyme can be used together to promote gut health. They can be combined in cooking or taken as supplements. However, it is important to talk to a healthcare provider before taking any supplements, especially if you are pregnant, breastfeeding, or taking medications.

Conclusion

Regardless of which side of the discussion you are on with Fennel seed vs Thyme, they are both known for their medicinal properties, particularly their ability to support gut health and aid in parasite cleansing.

Fennel seed has a history of being used for digestion, reducing inflammation, and relieving gas and bloating. It contains anethole, a compound with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, which helps reduce inflammation and oxidative stress in the gut.

Fennel seed also has anti-parasitic properties, eliminating harmful parasites and their eggs from the gut.

Thyme, on the other hand, has antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties that may help improve digestion and treat digestive issues.

Thyme oil is effective against a variety of parasites, including Giardia lamblia. It may also help reduce inflammation in the gut and improve overall gut health.

It is essential to consult with a healthcare professional before using any herbs or supplements, especially if you have a medical condition or are taking medication. Additionally, maintaining a healthy diet and lifestyle is crucial to support gut health and prevent parasitic infections.

What are your thoughts on the Fennel seed vs Thyme conversation? Share them with us on Instagram and Pinterest.

References

  1. “The effect of a fennel seed extract on the STAT signaling and intestinal barrier function” – B. Das, J. Rabalais, P. Kozan, T. Lu, N. Durali, K. Okamoto, M. D. McGeough, B. J. Lee, K. E. Barrett, R. Marchelletta, M. Sivagnanam, Date [PubMed] [Archive] ↩︎
  2. “Anti-Inflammatory and Antimicrobial Properties of Thyme Oil and Its Main Constituents” – E. Vassiliou, O. Awoleye, A. Davis, S. Mishra, 30 March 2023 [MDPI] [Archive] ↩︎
  3. “Effects of dietary fennel (Foeniculum vulgare Mill.) seed powder supplementation on growth performance, nutrient digestibility, small intestinal morphology, and carcass traits of broilers” – H. Liu, J. Li, S. Lin, T. Liu, C. Zheng, 28 January 2021 [PubMed] [Archive] ↩︎
  4. “Fennel” – J. P. Cunha, 20 August 2021 [RxList] [Archive] ↩︎
  5. “Parasitic Infections” – Sepsis Alliance Staff, 3 May 2022 [Sepsis Alliance] [Archive] ↩︎
  6. Antimicrobial Properties of Plant Essential Oils against Human Pathogens and Their Mode of Action: An Updated Review” – M. K. Swamy, M. S. Akhtar, U. R. Sinniah, 20 December 2016 [PubMed] [Archive] ↩︎
  7. “Nanoemulsion as an Effective Inhibitor of Biofilm-forming Bacterial Associated Drug Resistance: An Insight into COVID Based Nosocomial Infections” – D. S. Raj, D. Dhamodharan, S. Thanigaivel, A. S. Vickram, B. Hun-Soo, 23 February 2022 [SpringerLink] [Archive] ↩︎
  8. “Anti-protozoal activity of Thymol and a Thymol ester against Cryptosporidium parvum in cell culture” – A. Dominguez-Uscanga, D. F. Aycart, K. Li, W. H. Witola, J. E. A. Laborded, 18 February 2021 [PubMed] [Archive] ↩︎
  9. “The effect of fennel essential oil and trans-anethole on antibacterial activity of mupirocin against Staphylococcus aureus isolated from asymptomatic carriers” – P. Kwiatkowski, A. Pruss, H. Masiuk, M. Mnichowska-Polanowska, M. Kaczmarek, S. Giedrys-Kalemba, B. Dołęgowska, H. Zielińska-Bliźniewska, J. Olszewski, M. Sienkiewicz, 18 June 2019 [PubMed] [Archive] ↩︎
  10. “Irritable bowel syndrome and diet” – P. Portincasa, L. Bonfrate, O. de Bari, A. Lembo, S. Ballou, February 2017 [PubMed] [Archive] ↩︎
  11. “Impact of thymol in thyme extracts on their antispasmodic action and ciliary clearance” – F. Begrow, J. Engelbertz, B. Feistel, R. Lehnfeld, K. Bauer, E.J. Verspohl, March 2010 [PubMed] [Archive] ↩︎
  12. “Thyme, fresh” – USDA Staff, 1 April 2019 [USDA] [Archive] ↩︎
  13. “Fennel seeds” – USDA Staff, 1 April 2019 [USDA] [Archive] ↩︎

Last Updated on 2 weeks by D&C Editorial Team

About the Author

Christine has long been on the path to optimal health. With a history of weight loss coaching she is driven by a passion for nutrition, health and wellness. Having grown up in Africa before migrating to New Zealand, and then Australia, she has seen very strong contrasts in quality of life and is driven to help others understand the importance of taking a holistic approach to life.

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