What Is Chia Seeds Good For? 11 Powerful Health Benefits

It may seem like a strange question to ask ‘what is chia seeds good for?‘ but people are asking it. They bring many different health benefits, and are becoming a key part to many people’s diets.

These seeds are a good source of fiber, protein, and omega-3 fatty acids, among other nutrients. They can be eaten raw, added to foods and beverages, or even used as an egg substitute in baking.

Because of their high fiber and protein content, Chia Seeds can help promote feelings of fullness and may support weight loss. Some studies have even suggested that they may also have anti-inflammatory effects and may help improve cholesterol levels and blood sugar control. 1

These seeds are good for things like:

  • Supporting bodily functions through providing a high source of nutritional value 2
  • Preventing cellular deterioration through free radicals as a great source of antioxidants 3
  • Helping with weight loss through improving lipid profile 4
  • aiding digestion as a great source of fiber, and so much more 5

So, how did I come to put this article together? Recently, I was asked by a reader via our Facebook page ‘what is Chia Seeds good for?’ (or what are Chia Seeds good for?).

Where do Chia Seeds Come From?

The use of these seeds dates back to the pre-Colombian Aztec times. They originated from Guatemala, and Central and South Mexico. The chia plant (Salvia hispanica) is a member of the mint family (Lamiaceae). 6

History says that they were a staple food of the Aztecs and Mayans. The Mayans used chia seeds as a source of food and medicine. They would grind the seeds into flour and use it to make bread, porridge, and other dishes.

They also believed that these seeds had medicinal properties and used them to treat a variety of ailments, such as fatigue and stomach problems. In addition, they were used as a source of energy for warriors and runners, who would carry the seeds with them on long journeys and eat them as needed to maintain their strength and endurance.

Chia seeds were first introduced to the rest of the world in the 16th century when Spanish conquistadors arrived in Central and South America. The conquistadors encountered the seeds being used by the Aztecs and Mayans and, along with other indigenous foods, brought them back to Europe.

However, chia seeds did not become widely known or used in other parts of the world until much later. In recent years, they have gained popularity as a health food and are now grown and consumed in many countries.

Today, chia seeds are grown in many countries, including Mexico, Bolivia, and Argentina. They come in either white, grey, brown or black. Regardless of the colour, the benefit seems almost endless.

What are the Health Benefits of Chia Seeds?

Oh my gosh, where do I begin? These amazing seeds have been dubbed a ‘super-food’ because they are among some of the healthiest foods on the planet. 

Along with the benefits mentioned in the opening of this article (supporting weight loss, being loaded with antioxidants, and aiding digestion), they are a nutrient-dense food that is important for your body and brain. So, what are Chia seeds good for, you ask? They are:

Benefit 1 – Nutrients Dense and Low in Calories

Ok, so the cat may be out of the bag a little with this one, but, it’s a deep topic to explore. As we know all too well, these seeds are very popular with the health food set and are now consumed by health-conscious people all over the world. But, did you know that for every 28 grams, or 1 ounce serving of Chia seeds, they contain approximately:

Calories137
Water5.8%
Sugar0g
Carbohydrates11.05g
Fiber8.97g
Fats7.96g
Saturated Fats0.87g
Monounsaturated Fats0.61g
Polyunsaturated Fats6.21g
Omega-34.68g
Omega-61.53g
Trans Fats0.03g
Vitamin A7.9 IU
Vitamin B10.21mg
Vitamin B20.016mg
Vitamin B32.26mg
Vitamin B60.02mg
Vitamin B120.02mcg
Vitamin C0.97mg
Vitamin E0.18mg
Calcium176.23mg
Copper0.36mg
Iron2.12mg
Magnesium94.8mg
Manganese0.55mg
Phosphorous201mg
Potassium187.3mg
Sodium2.81mg
Zinc0.96mg
Depending upon the source of information and the origin of the Chia Seeds, along with how they have been processed, nutritional values can vary. Data provided by the USDA can be found here 7

If that wasn’t enough to provide you with an outline of what is chia seeds good for, consider the following. Chia seeds are also a source of flavonoids and other organic compounds required to maintain good health. Some of these include:

Lignin

And then we have Lignin. Lignin is a complex organic polymer that is found in the cell walls of plants. It is a major component of the cell walls of vascular plants, such as trees and grasses, and is responsible for providing structural support and protection to the plant.

Lignin is a highly cross-linked polymer that is composed of a variety of different monomers, including p-coumaryl, coniferyl, and sinapyl alcohols.

Lignin is a major contributor to the toughness and rigidity of plant tissues and is an important component of wood, bark, and other plant tissues. It is also a major contributor to the resistance of plant tissues to decomposition, making it an important component of plant-based products such as paper and textiles.

Chia seeds contain relatively low levels of lignin compared to other plant-based sources. According to one study, the lignin content of chia seeds was found to be around 1.7% of the total weight of the seeds. 8

However, the lignin content of chia seeds can vary depending on the specific variety of the plant, growing conditions, and the method of preparation.

Lignin is not an essential nutrient for human health and does not have any known direct benefits for the human body. Lignin is not digested by the human body and passes through the gastrointestinal tract largely unchanged.

However, lignin may have some indirect health benefits due to its presence in plant-based foods, such as chia seeds. Plant-based foods that contain lignin, such as chia seeds, are a good source of dietary fiber, which is important for maintaining bowel regularity and supporting the health of the digestive system.

In addition, plant-based foods that contain lignin, such as chia seeds, may also provide other potential health benefits due to the presence of other nutrients and plant compounds, such as antioxidants and phytochemicals. These compounds may have anti-inflammatory and anti-carcinogenic effects and may help to reduce the risk of certain diseases, such as heart disease and certain types of cancer.

As much as Lignin is not considered to be an essential nutrient, it is worth noting that the health benefits of plant-based foods, including chia seeds, are likely due to the combined effects of all the nutrients and plant compounds they contain, rather than any single component such as lignin.

What is chia seeds good for? A source of Lignin.

Benefit 2 – Rich in Antioxidants

Chia seeds contain several different types of antioxidants, including flavonoids, such as quercetin, kaempferol, and myricetin, as well as hydroxycinnamic acids, such as caffeic acid and ferulic acid. These antioxidants have been shown to have many potential health benefits, including reducing inflammation, improving cardiovascular health, and aiding in weight loss.

Did you know that it is the antioxidants present in the seeds also prevent the fats in the seeds from decomposing and going rancid?

Myricetin

Myricetin is a type of flavonoid, a class of plant compounds that are found in a wide variety of fruits, vegetables, and other plant-based foods. Myricetin is a yellow, crystalline compound that is found in a variety of foods, including onions, apples, berries, red wine, and tea.

Myricetin has several potential health benefits, including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticarcinogenic properties. 9

It has been shown to have a protective effect against various types of cancer, including breast, colon, and prostate cancer. Myricetin may also help to reduce the risk of heart disease and diabetes.

In addition to its potential health benefits, myricetin is also used in the production of various commercial products, such as cosmetics, food additives, and pharmaceuticals. It is often used as a natural preservative and flavour enhancer in a variety of products.

The concentration of myricetin in chia seeds can vary depending on a number of factors, including the variety of the plant, growing conditions, and the method of preparation.

In general, chia seeds are a good source of myricetin and other flavonoids, and have been shown to have a high antioxidant capacity.

According to one study, the concentration of myricetin in chia seeds was found to be around 0.4% of the total weight of the seeds. However, this value can vary widely depending on the specific type of chia seeds and the conditions in which they were grown. The concentration of myricetin in chia seeds may be affected by factors such as storage conditions and processing methods.

What is chia seeds good for? A source of Myricetin.

Quercetin

Quercetin is a type of flavonoid, a class of plant compounds that are found in a wide variety of fruits, vegetables, and other plant-based foods. It is a yellow, crystalline compound that is found in a variety of foods, including onions, apples, berries, red wine, and tea.

Quercetin has several potential health benefits, including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticarcinogenic properties. 10

It has been shown to have a protective effect against various types of cancer, including breast, colon, and prostate cancer. Quercetin may also help to reduce the risk of heart disease and diabetes.

In addition to its potential health benefits, quercetin is also used in the production of various commercial products, such as cosmetics, food additives, and pharmaceuticals. It is often used as a natural preservative and flavour enhancer in a variety of products.

The concentration of quercetin, like other flavonoids and organic compounds found in chia seeds, can vary depending on a number of factors, including the variety of the plant, growing conditions, and the method of preparation.

In general, chia seeds are a good source of quercetin and other flavonoids and have been shown to have a high antioxidant capacity.

According to one study, the concentration of quercetin in chia seeds was found to be around 0.4% of the total weight of the seeds. 11

What is chia seeds good for? A source of Quercetin.

Kaempferol

Kaempferol is another type of flavonoid, a class of plant compounds that are found in a wide variety of fruits, vegetables, and other plant-based foods. It is a yellow, crystalline compound that is found in a variety of foods other than chia seeds including onions, apples, berries, red wine, and tea.

Kaempferol has a number of potential health benefits, including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticarcinogenic properties. It has been shown to have a protective effect against various types of cancer, including breast, colon, and prostate cancer. Kaempferol may also help to reduce the risk of heart disease and diabetes. 12

In addition to its potential health benefits, kaempferol is also used in the production of various commercial products, such as cosmetics, food additives, and pharmaceuticals. It is often used as a natural preservative and flavor enhancer in a variety of products.

According to one study, the concentration of kaempferol in chia seeds was found to be around 0.4% of the total weight of the seeds. 13

What is chia seeds good for? A source of Kaempferol.

Caffeic Acid

Caffeic acid is a hydroxycinnamic acid, a type of organic compound that is commonly found in plants. It is a white, crystalline solid with a bitter taste and is soluble in water, alcohol, and ether.

Caffeic acid is not only found in chia seeds, it is also found in a variety of plants, including coffee, olives, grapes, apples, and other fruits, as well as in various herbs and spices such as thyme, rosemary, and basil. It is also found in various beverages and foods, including wine, beer, and black and green teas.

Caffeic acid has several potential health benefits, including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticarcinogenic properties. 14

It has been shown to have a protective effect against various types of cancer, including breast, colon, and prostate cancer. Caffeic acid may also help to reduce the risk of heart disease and diabetes. 15

Caffeic acid is also used in the production of various commercial products, such as cosmetics, food additives, and pharmaceuticals. It is often used as a natural preservative and flavour enhancer in a variety of products.

The concentration of caffeic acid in chia seeds can vary depending on some factors, including the variety of the plant, growing conditions, and the method of preparation. In general, chia seeds contain relatively high levels of caffeic acid compared to other plant-based sources.

According to one study, the concentration of caffeic acid in chia seeds was found to be around 0.5% of the total weight of the seeds. 16

However, this value can vary widely depending on the specific type of chia seeds and the conditions in which they were grown. It is also worth noting that the concentration of caffeic acid in chia seeds may be affected by factors such as storage conditions and processing methods.

It is worth noting that the concentration of caffeic acid in chia seeds is relatively low compared to other sources of caffeic acid, such as coffee, which can contain up to 2% caffeic acid by weight.

What is chia seeds good for? A source of Caffeic acid.

Ferulic Acid

Ferulic acid is a hydroxycinnamic acid, a type of organic compound that is commonly found in plants. It is a white, crystalline solid with a bitter taste and is soluble in water, alcohol, and ether. Ferulic acid is found in a variety of plants, including rice, wheat, oats, corn, and other grains, as well as in various herbs and spices such as thyme, rosemary, and basil. It is also found in various beverages and foods, including coffee, wine, and black and green teas.

Ferulic acid has some potential health benefits, including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticarcinogenic properties. It has been shown to have a protective effect against various types of cancer, including breast, colon, and prostate cancer. Ferulic acid may also help to reduce the risk of heart disease and diabetes.

Ferulic acid is also used in the production of various commercial products, such as cosmetics, food additives, and pharmaceuticals. It is often used as a natural preservative and flavor enhancer in a variety of products.

According to one study, the concentration of ferulic acid in chia seeds was found to be around 0.3% of the total weight of the seeds. 17

What is chia seeds good for? A source of Ferulic acid.

Benefit 3 – Low-carb

The carbohydrates found in Chia are mostly fiber. Fiber assist with maintaining healthy blood sugar levels. They shouldn’t be considered as a carbohydrate because they don’t require insulin to break them down. 

The true carbohydrate content of Chia is about 11 grams per ounce, which is very low. The fiber in Chia feeds the good bacteria in the bowels, which is important because good bacteria are crucial for a healthy gut.

Benefit 4 – High in Protein and Amino Acids


Chia seeds are a good source of protein and contain a variety of amino acids. One ounce (28 grams) of chia seeds contains about 4 grams of protein, which is made up of a range of amino acids.

The amino acids found in chia seeds include:

  1. Alanine
  2. Arginine
  3. Aspartic acid
  4. Cysteine
  5. Glutamic acid
  6. Glycine
  7. Histidine
  8. Isoleucine
  9. Leucine
  10. Lysine
  11. Methionine
  12. Phenylalanine
  13. Proline
  14. Serine
  15. Threonine
  16. Tryptophan
  17. Tyrosine
  18. Valine

It’s worth noting that chia seeds are not considered a complete protein source, meaning they don’t contain all nine essential amino acids in sufficient quantities to meet the daily requirements for all people.

However, chia seeds can still be a useful protein source when combined with other plant-based protein sources, such as beans, nuts, and grains.

What is chia seeds good for? A source of 18 types of amino acids!

Benefit 5 – Good for Weight Loss

Chia seeds may help support weight loss in a few different ways.

First, chia seeds are high in fiber, which can help you feel full and satisfied after eating. This can help you eat less overall and potentially support weight loss.

Second, chia seeds are a low-calorie food, with only about 137 calories per ounce (28 grams). This means that you can incorporate chia seeds into your diet without adding a lot of extra calories.

Third, chia seeds are a good source of protein, which can help support weight loss by keeping you feeling full and satisfied after eating.

Did you know that protein has also been shown to help preserve lean body mass while you’re losing weight, which is important for maintaining a healthy metabolism?

Finally, chia seeds are a low-carb food, with only about 11 grams of carbs per ounce (28 grams). This can be beneficial for weight loss, as a low-carb diet may help reduce appetite, increase fat burning, and improve blood sugar control.

It’s worth noting that while chia seeds may have some potential benefits for weight loss, they should be incorporated as part of a well-rounded diet that includes a variety of healthy foods and regular physical activity.

They are not a magic bullet for weight loss and should not be relied upon as the sole means for losing weight.

Benefit 6 – High in Omega-3 Fatty Acids

Chia seeds are a good source of healthy fats, including omega-3 fatty acids. Omega-3 fatty acids are a type of polyunsaturated fat that is important for overall health. They are known for their anti-inflammatory effects and have been shown to have a variety of potential health benefits, including:

  • Reducing inflammation and the risk of chronic diseases such as heart disease and cancer
  • Improving brain health and cognitive function
  • Reducing symptoms of depression and anxiety
  • Reducing the risk of arthritis through supporting overall joint health
  • Lowering blood pressure 18
  • Improving blood sugar control

One ounce (28 grams) of chia seeds contains about 8 grams of fat, of which about 6 grams are omega-3 fatty acids.

The primary omega-3 fatty acid found in chia seeds is alpha-linolenic acid which is a type of plant-based omega-3 that is converted into the longer-chain omega-3s EPA and DHA in the body. The research into how these acids play a part in potentially controlling breast and cervical cancer is a source of hope for many. 19

What is chia seeds good for? A source of Omega-3 fatty acids.

Benefit 7 – Sugar-free

Chia supports insulin resistance, and helps to improve circulation, and lower the risk of Heart Disease and Type 2 Diabetes by stabilizing the blood sugar levels. 

Being a good source of alpha-linolenic acid, they have been shown to improve insulin sensitivity and reduce inflammation in some studies. 20

Warning: Chia seeds do not react well with blood thinners and or blood pressure medicines.

If you are taking blood thinners or blood pressure medications. It is also important to be aware that chia seeds may interfere with the absorption of certain medications, so it is generally recommended to take your medications at least two hours before or after consuming chia seeds.

It is important to speak with your healthcare provider before adding chia seeds to your diet.

Benefit 8 – High in Calcium and Protein

Chia seeds are a good source of calcium, with about 177 milligrams of calcium per ounce (28 grams).

Calcium is an essential mineral that is important for a variety of bodily functions, including building and maintaining strong bones, blood clotting, nerve function, and muscle function.

It’s worth noting that while chia seeds are a good source of calcium, like any other foods, they should not be relied upon as the sole source of this important nutrient.

It is important to consume a variety of calcium-rich foods as part of a well-rounded diet to ensure adequate intake of this mineral.

Good sources of plant based calcium include leafy green vegetables, nuts and seeds, and fortified foods such as tofu and orange juice.

As much as calcium is good for teeth and bones, according to the research, there are even more benefits the be gained from collagen.

What is chia seeds good for? A source of calcium and protein.

Benefit 9 – High in Fiber

Fiber can help support removing toxins from the body by adding bulk to the stool and helping to keep the digestive system regular. This can help prevent constipation and other digestive problems, such as diverticulitis and hemorrhoids.

Fiber also helps to bind to toxins and other waste products in the intestine and carry them out of the body. This can help support the detoxification process and promote overall health.

Here’s some particularly good news for Type 2 Diabetics; the fiber from Chia seeds are low GI (glycemic index) and slowly release glucose into the bloodstream. Therefore, consuming them reduces the blood sugar spikes when they are a staple in a meal. 

It’s worth noting that while fiber can help support the removal of toxins from the body, it is not the only factor that determines how effective the body is at removing toxins. Other factors, such as overall diet and lifestyle habits, also play a role in the body’s ability to detoxify.

Benefit 10 – Used as a Natural Energy or Sports Drink

These seeds have been used to help with improving exercise performance. Amazingly, they can absorb between 9 and 12 times their weight in fluid.

Some studies have suggested that chia seeds may improve endurance, reduce inflammation, and enhance muscle function, although more research is needed to confirm these effects.

To use chia seeds as a natural energy or sports drink, you can mix them with water or another liquid, such as coconut water or a sports drink, and let them sit for a few minutes to form a gel-like consistency.

Or you could try mixing 1-2 tablespoons of Chia seeds with 1-2 tablespoons of fresh lemon, 1-2 Cups of water/fruit juice and 1-2 tablespoons of honey.

You can then drink the mixture before or during exercise to help fuel your body and support performance.

Remember, ancient Aztecs and Mayans warriors consumed these seeds to give them energy, stamina and to help improve performance.

Benefit 11 – 100% Gluten Free

Chia seeds are naturally gluten-free. They are a type of seed that comes from the Salvia hispanica plant, which is a member of the mint family. Chia seeds do not contain any gluten, and are considered safe for people with celiac disease, or other gluten sensitivities to consume.

It’s worth noting that while chia seeds are naturally gluten-free, they may be processed in facilities that also handle gluten-containing grains, such as wheat, rye, and barley.

If you have celiac disease, or a severe gluten sensitivity, it is important to choose chia seeds that are labeled as “gluten-free” to ensure that they have been processed in a facility that does not handle gluten-containing grains.

Hint: Chia seeds also go well with Buckwheat if you are making a smoothie bowl.

How to Use Chia Seeds

Chia seeds are a versatile ingredient that can be used in a variety of different ways. Some common ways to use chia seeds include:

  • Mixing them into smoothies or oatmeal
  • Sprinkling them over salads or yogurt
  • Adding them to baked goods, such as bread, muffins, and cookies
  • Using them to thicken sauces and soups
  • Mixing them with water to make a gel-like consistency and using them as an egg substitute in vegan recipes
  • Adding them to energy bars or other snacks, and
  • Using them to make chia seed pudding by mixing them with milk or another liquid and allowing them to sit until they form a gel-like consistency.
What is Chia Seeds Good For? bite size chia seed muesli bar on a turquoise cafe plate with an gold fork
Delicious treats and more. Find this image on Instagram.
What is Chia Seeds Good For? bite size chia seed muesli bar on a turquoise cafe plate with an gold fork
Go on, have a taste! Find this image on Instagram.

Chia seeds can also be eaten on their own as a snack, although it is generally recommended to soak them in water or another liquid for a few minutes before consuming them to improve their texture and make them easier to digest.

It’s worth noting that while chia seeds are a healthy and versatile ingredient, they should be consumed in moderation as part of a well-rounded diet.

Chia Seeds Benefits for Females

Chis seeds do not discriminate based on gender. They are great for both men and women. Granted, there are biological differences between men and women, but the nutritional value offered is universal.

Chia seeds are a good source of nutrients that may have a variety of potential health benefits for males and females. Some of the potential benefits of chia seeds include:

  • Supporting heart health
    • Chia seeds are a good source of fiber, protein, and healthy fats, including plant-based omega-3 fatty acids, which are known for their anti-inflammatory effects and have been shown to have a variety of potential health benefits, including reducing the risk of heart disease.
  • Supporting blood sugar control
    • Chia seeds are a low-carb food, with only about 11 grams of carbs per ounce (28 grams). They are also high in fiber, with about 9 grams of fiber per ounce (28 grams). Both of these characteristics may help support insulin sensitivity and blood sugar control.
  • Supporting physical performance
    • Chia seeds are a good source of nutrients that may help support physical performance and recovery. Some studies have suggested that chia seeds may improve endurance, reduce inflammation, and enhance muscle function, although more research is needed to confirm these effects.
  • Supporting weight management
    • Chia seeds are a low-calorie food, with only about 137 calories per ounce (28 grams). They are also high in fiber, which can help you feel full and satisfied after eating, potentially supporting weight loss.
  • Supporting bone health
    • Chia seeds are a good source of calcium, with about 177 milligrams of calcium per ounce (28 grams). Calcium is an important mineral for maintaining strong bones and may be particularly important for females as they get older and their risk of osteoporosis increases. 21

It’s worth noting that while chia seeds may have some potential health benefits for males, they should be consumed as part of a well-rounded diet and in moderation. They should not be relied upon as the sole means for improving your health.

Chia Seeds Side Effects in Females

Chia seeds are generally considered safe to consume as part of a healthy diet. However, like any food, they may cause side effects in some people.

Some possible side effects of consuming chia seeds include:

  • Allergic reactions
    • Some people may be allergic to chia seeds and may experience symptoms such as itching, hives, difficulty breathing, and swelling of the face, lips, tongue, or throat. If you experience any of these symptoms after consuming chia seeds, it is important to seek medical attention.
  • Digestive problems
    • Consuming large amounts of chia seeds may cause digestive problems, such as bloating, gas, and constipation. This is due to their high fiber content and may be more likely to occur if you are not used to consuming a lot of fiber. To avoid these side effects, it is recommended to start with a small serving of chia seeds and gradually increase your intake as your body adjusts.
  • Interactions with medications
    • Chia seeds may interfere with the absorption of certain medications, so it is generally recommended to take your medications at least two hours before or after consuming chia seeds. It is also important to speak with your healthcare provider if you are taking any medications, as chia seeds may interact with some medications or affect blood pressure.

It’s worth noting that while chia seeds are generally considered safe, they should be consumed in moderation as part of a well-rounded diet. If you have any concerns about the safety or potential side effects of consuming chia seeds, it is important to speak with your healthcare provider.

Chia Seeds Benefits for Males

There is no specific evidence to suggest that chia seeds have any male-specific health benefits. Chia seeds are a good source of nutrients that may have a variety of potential health benefits for both males and females.

Consider the list of benefits shown above which also applies to men.

Side Effects of Chia Seeds in Males

Like the benefits to be had from chia seeds, the potential side effects are highly unlikely to be gender specific.

Consider the list of benefits shown above which also applies to men.

Are Chia Seeds Good for Weight Loss?

Adding Chia seeds to your diet may help with controlling and potentially losing weight. The main thing to keep in mind with this is that living on Chia seeds alone won’t bring you any real benefit. They are a great addition to a diet, but not likely to be an effective corner stone.

A well balanced diet, and exercise, along with maintaining good hydration helps to keep your body functioning well.

Most people who see improvements in weight loss find that it is not so much about what they eat, but how their activity increase results in a caloric deficit. This along with the right kinds of food to support a healthy lifestyle is where the results are found.

Are Chia Seeds Alkalizing?

It is often claimed that chia seeds are alkalizing, meaning that they can help balance the pH of the body and promote an alkaline environment. Many Researchers believe that there is still a lack of solid scientific evidence which is able to support this claim.

When foods are considered to be acid forming or alkaline forming, this is a reference to the measure of their pH in how they either increase the overall acidity or alkalinity of your digestive system.

The pH scale is set as a numeric measure that covers a range starting at zero and going up to 14. In the middle of the scale is 7, which is the measure of neutrality (neutral pH). Foods that have a pH below 7 are considered acidic, while those with a pH above 7 are considered alkaline.

It is generally believed that consuming a diet high in alkaline foods may help reduce the risk of certain health conditions, such as bone loss and kidney stones. However, many Researchers believe that the pH of the body is tightly regulated and is not easily influenced by the foods we eat.

While chia seeds are a good source of nutrients and may have some potential health benefits, it is not clear if they have any effect on the pH of the body. More research is needed to determine if chia seeds are alkalizing and if they have any impact on health.

It’s worth noting that while the pH of the body is important, it is not the only factor that determines overall health. A well-rounded diet that includes a variety of healthy foods, along with regular physical activity and other healthy lifestyle habits, is the best approach for maintaining overall health.

You may also want to consider:

Want to find out how to process your own Chia Seeds grown at home? Check out the video below!

FAQs

How much Chia Seeds should you Eat a Day?

It is generally recommended to consume about 20-30 grams (1-2 tablespoons) of chia seeds per day. Chia seeds are a good source of fiber, protein, and omega-3 fatty acids, and they can be easily incorporated into a variety of dishes and beverages.

However, it’s important to keep in mind that everyone’s nutritional needs are different, and you should consult with your trusted Doctor or Dietitian to determine the appropriate intake for you.

Additionally, it’s always a good idea to drink plenty of water when consuming chia seeds, as they can absorb a significant amount of liquid and may cause digestive issues if not properly hydrated.

What happens if I eat Chia Seeds everyday?

Eating chia seeds every day can provide a number of potential health benefits. Chia seeds are a good source of fiber, protein, and omega-3 fatty acids, which are important for maintaining a healthy diet. They can also help to regulate blood sugar levels, reduce inflammation, and improve digestion

However, it’s important to consume chia seeds in moderation, as they can also have some potential drawbacks. Some people may experience digestive issues, such as bloating or gas, after consuming chia seeds, especially if they are not adequately hydrated.

Chia seeds are also high in calories, so it’s important to monitor your intake if you are trying to maintain a healthy weight.

Can Chia Seeds Reduce Belly Fat?

There is some evidence to suggest that chia seeds may have the potential to help reduce belly fat. Chia seeds are high in fiber, which can help to promote fullness and reduce appetite, potentially leading to weight loss. Additionally, chia seeds are a good source of protein, which can help to increase metabolism and burn more calories.

However, it’s important to note that the effects of chia seeds on weight loss and belly fat reduction are not fully understood and more research is needed. While chia seeds may be a helpful addition to a healthy diet and lifestyle, they should not be viewed as a magic solution for losing weight or reducing belly fat.

A healthy diet and regular physical activity are still the most important factors for achieving and maintaining a healthy weight. It’s always a good idea to speak with your trusted Doctor or Dietitian for personalised advice on how to achieve your health and wellness goals.

Do Chia Seeds help you Lose Weight?

There is some evidence to suggest that chia seeds may be helpful for weight loss as part of a healthy diet and lifestyle. Chia seeds are high in fiber, which can help to promote fullness and reduce appetite, potentially leading to weight loss. Additionally, chia seeds are a good source of protein, which can help to increase metabolism and burn more calories.

However, it’s important to note that the effects of chia seeds on weight loss are not fully understood and more research is needed.

While chia seeds may be a helpful addition to a weight loss plan, they should not be viewed as a magic solution for losing weight. A healthy diet and regular physical activity are still the most important factors for achieving and maintaining a healthy weight.

In Conclusion

Now you know what is chia seeds good for and how beneficial they are, I’d bet you’re wondering what to eat them with or maybe, what to put them in. The short answer is; lots of things. It is incredibly easy to incorporate this super-food into your diet. You can even add them to a colon cleanse mix to help get some good fats into your system.

Sprouted Chia seeds can be mixed through salads. Try sprinkling raw or toasted Chia seeds over salads raw. You could also add them to salad dressings.

They also work well in baking where you can add them to bread, muffins, or cakes. For a quick breakfast option, try adding them to porridge, or use them in your smoothies. Seriously, with all of these options anything goes.

And because Chia seeds form a gel-like consistency when mixed with liquids, they can also be used as an egg substitute in recipes. Apparently, the Aztec and Mayan cultures added them to Kombucha. The Chinese cultures add these seeds to sweet tea.

Now that you are aware of what is Chia seeds good for, you can include them to your foods and drinks to start benefiting from all these amazing seeds have to offer. Oh, and before I go, if you’re wondering ‘where can I get these seeds from’? Most organic health food stores sell them. Enjoy!

References

  1. “Nutritional and therapeutic perspectives of Chia (Salvia hispanica L.): a review” – R. Ullah, M. Nadeem, A. Khalique, M. Imran, S. Mehmood, A. Javid, J. Hussain, April 2016 [PubMed] [Archive]
  2. “The Nutrition Source – Chia Seeds” – School of Public Health, 19 March 2018 [Harvard T H Chan] [Archive]
  3. “Are chia seeds effective for losing weight?” – M. Hatanaka, Z. Villines, 21 August 2019 [Medical News Today] [Archive]
  4. “Chia induces clinically discrete weight loss and improves lipid profile only in altered previous values” – L. T. Toscano, L. T. Toscano, R. L. Tavares, C. S. O. Silva, A. S. Silva, December 2014 [PubMed] [Archive]
  5. “Chia Seeds and Digestive Health” – B. Bolen, A. Herries, 19 November 2014 [Very Well Health] [Archive]
  6. “The Chemical Composition and Nutritional Value of Chia Seeds – Current State of Knowledge” – B. Kulczyński, J. K. Cisowska, M. Taczanowski, D. Kmiecik, A. G. Michałowska, 31 May 2019 [PubMed] [Archive]
  7. “Chia (Salvia hispanica L.) oil extraction using different organic solvents: Oil yield, fatty acids profile and technological analysis of defatted meal” – C. Silva, V. Garcia, C. Zanette, April 2016 [ResearchGate]
  8. “Myricetin: A Dietary Molecule with Diverse Biological Activities” – D. K. Semwal, R. B. Semwal, S. Combrinck, A. Viljoen, 16 February 2016 [PubMed] [Archive]
  9. “Quercetin, Inflammation and Immunity” – Y. Li, J. Yao, C. Han, J. Yang, M. T. Chaudhry, S. Wang, H. Liu, Y. Yin, 15 March 2016 [PubMed] [Archive]
  10. “Nutritional and therapeutic perspectives of Chia (Salvia hispanica L.): a review” – R. Ullah, M. Nadeem, A. Khalique, M. Imran, S. Mehmood, A. Javid, J. Hussain, 1 October 2015 [PubMed] [Archive]
  11. “Ameliorative effect of kaempferol, a flavonoid, on oxidative stress in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats” – K. S. Al-Numair, G. Chandramohan, C. Veeramani, M. A. Alsaif, 12 December 2014 [PubMed] [Archive]
  12. “Determination of Bioactive Compounds in Sequential Extracts of Chia Leaf (Salvia hispanica L.) Using UHPLC-HRMS (Q-Orbitrap) and a Global Evaluation of Antioxidant In Vitro Capacity” – M. C. Zúñiga-López, G. Maturana, G. Campmajó, J. Saurina, O. Núñez, 20 July 2021 [PubMed] [Archive]
  13. “Chia seeds: an ancient grain trending in modern human diets” – D. Melo, T. B. Machado, M. B. P. P. Oliveira, 19 June 2019 [PubMed] [Archive]
  14. “Efficacy of Caffeic Acid on Diabetes and Its Complications in the Mouse” – N. Oršolić, D. Sirovina, D. Odeh, G. Gajski, V. Balta, L. Šver, M. J. Jembrek, 28 May 2021 [PubMed] [Archive]
  15. “Characterization of phenolic compounds in chia (Salvia hispanica L.) seeds, fiber flour and oil” – S. C. Oliveira-Alves, D. B. Vendramini-Costa, C. B. B. Cazarin, M. B. M. Júnior, J. P. B. Ferreira, A. B. Silvae, M. A. Prado, M. R. Bronze, 1 October 2017 [ScienceDirect] [Archive]
  16. “Synthesis and Characterization of Chitosan Particles Loaded with Antioxidants Extracted from Chia (Salvia hispanica L.) Seeds” – G. Morales-Olán, S. Luna-Suárez, J. D. D. Figueroa-Cárdenas, M. Corea, M. Rojas-López, 14 June 2021 [PubMed] [Archive]
  17. “Alpha-linolenic acid regulates the growth of breast and cervical cancer cell lines through regulation of NO release and induction of lipid peroxidation” – R. Deshpande, P. Mansara, S. Suryavanshi, R. K. Ghanekar, 20 February 2013 [Journal of Molecular Biochemistry] [Archive]
  18. “Chia seed (Salvia hispanica L.) effects and their molecular mechanisms on unbalanced diet experimental studies: A systematic review” – B. N. Enes, L. P. D. Moreira, B. S. Silva, M. Grancieri, H. G. Lúcio, V. P. Venâncio, S. U. M. Talcott, C. O. B. Rosa, H. S. D. Martino, 23 January 2020 [PubMed] [Archive]
  19. “FoodData Central Search Results – Seeds, Chia Seeds, dried” – Agriculture Research Service, 1 April 2019 [USDA] [Archive]
  20. “Long-Term Dietary Intake of Chia Seed Is Associated with Increased Bone Mineral Content and Improved Hepatic and Intestinal Morphology in Sprague-Dawley Rats” – E. M. M. Chañi, S. O. S. Pacheco, G. A. Martínez, M. R. Freitas, J. G. Ivona, J. A. Ivona, W. J. Craig, F. J. Pacheco, 19 July 2018 [PubMed] [Archive]
  21. “Chia seed ( Salvia hispanica L.) supplementation to the diet of adults with type 2 diabetes improved systolic blood pressure: A randomized controlled trial” – E. Z. M. Alwosais, E. A. Ozairi. T. A. Zafar, S. Alkandari, 2 February 2021 [PubMed] [Archive]
  1. “Nutritional and therapeutic perspectives of Chia (Salvia hispanica L.): a review” – R. Ullah, M. Nadeem, A. Khalique, M. Imran, S. Mehmood, A. Javid, J. Hussain, April 2016 [PubMed] [Archive] ↩︎
  2. “The Nutrition Source – Chia Seeds” – School of Public Health, 19 March 2018 [Harvard T H Chan] [Archive] ↩︎
  3. “Are chia seeds effective for losing weight?” – M. Hatanaka, Z. Villines, 21 August 2019 [Medical News Today] [Archive] ↩︎
  4. “Chia induces clinically discrete weight loss and improves lipid profile only in altered previous values” – L. T. Toscano, L. T. Toscano, R. L. Tavares, C. S. O. Silva, A. S. Silva, December 2014 [PubMed] [Archive] ↩︎
  5. “Chia Seeds and Digestive Health” – B. Bolen, A. Herries, 19 November 2014 [Very Well Health] [Archive] ↩︎
  6. “The Chemical Composition and Nutritional Value of Chia Seeds – Current State of Knowledge” – B. Kulczyński, J. K. Cisowska, M. Taczanowski, D. Kmiecik, A. G. Michałowska, 31 May 2019 [PubMed] [Archive] ↩︎
  7. “Chia seed ( Salvia hispanica L.) supplementation to the diet of adults with type 2 diabetes improved systolic blood pressure: A randomized controlled trial” – E. Z. M. Alwosais, E. A. Ozairi. T. A. Zafar, S. Alkandari, 2 February 2021 [PubMed] [Archive] ↩︎
  8. “Chia (Salvia hispanica L.) oil extraction using different organic solvents: Oil yield, fatty acids profile and technological analysis of defatted meal” – C. Silva, V. Garcia, C. Zanette, April 2016 [ResearchGate] [Archive] ↩︎
  9. “Myricetin: A Dietary Molecule with Diverse Biological Activities” – D. K. Semwal, R. B. Semwal, S. Combrinck, A. Viljoen, 16 February 2016 [PubMed] [Archive] ↩︎
  10. “Quercetin, Inflammation and Immunity” – Y. Li, J. Yao, C. Han, J. Yang, M. T. Chaudhry, S. Wang, H. Liu, Y. Yin, 15 March 2016 [PubMed] [Archive] ↩︎
  11. “Nutritional and therapeutic perspectives of Chia (Salvia hispanica L.): a review” – R. Ullah, M. Nadeem, A. Khalique, M. Imran, S. Mehmood, A. Javid, J. Hussain, 1 October 2015 [PubMed] [Archive] ↩︎
  12. “Ameliorative effect of kaempferol, a flavonoid, on oxidative stress in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats” – K. S. Al-Numair, G. Chandramohan, C. Veeramani, M. A. Alsaif, 12 December 2014 [PubMed] [Archive] ↩︎
  13. “Determination of Bioactive Compounds in Sequential Extracts of Chia Leaf (Salvia hispanica L.) Using UHPLC-HRMS (Q-Orbitrap) and a Global Evaluation of Antioxidant In Vitro Capacity” – M. C. Zúñiga-López, G. Maturana, G. Campmajó, J. Saurina, O. Núñez, 20 July 2021 [PubMed] [Archive] ↩︎
  14. “Chia seeds: an ancient grain trending in modern human diets” – D. Melo, T. B. Machado, M. B. P. P. Oliveira, 19 June 2019 [PubMed] [Archive] ↩︎
  15. “Efficacy of Caffeic Acid on Diabetes and Its Complications in the Mouse” – N. Oršolić, D. Sirovina, D. Odeh, G. Gajski, V. Balta, L. Šver, M. J. Jembrek, 28 May 2021 [PubMed] [Archive] ↩︎
  16. “Characterization of phenolic compounds in chia (Salvia hispanica L.) seeds, fiber flour and oil” – S. C. Oliveira-Alves, D. B. Vendramini-Costa, C. B. B. Cazarin, M. B. M. Júnior, J. P. B. Ferreira, A. B. Silvae, M. A. Prado, M. R. Bronze, 1 October 2017 [ScienceDirect] [Archive] ↩︎
  17. “Synthesis and Characterization of Chitosan Particles Loaded with Antioxidants Extracted from Chia (Salvia hispanica L.) Seeds” – G. Morales-Olán, S. Luna-Suárez, J. D. D. Figueroa-Cárdenas, M. Corea, M. Rojas-López, 14 June 2021 [PubMed] [Archive] ↩︎
  18. “Chia seed ( Salvia hispanica L.) supplementation to the diet of adults with type 2 diabetes improved systolic blood pressure: A randomized controlled trial” – E. Z. M. Alwosais, E. A. Ozairi. T. A. Zafar, S. Alkandari, 2 February 2021 [PubMed] [Archive] ↩︎
  19. “Alpha-linolenic acid regulates the growth of breast and cervical cancer cell lines through regulation of NO release and induction of lipid peroxidation” – R. Deshpande, P. Mansara, S. Suryavanshi, R. K. Ghanekar, 20 February 2013 [Journal of Molecular Biochemistry] [Archive] ↩︎
  20. “Chia seed (Salvia hispanica L.) effects and their molecular mechanisms on unbalanced diet experimental studies: A systematic review” – B. N. Enes, L. P. D. Moreira, B. S. Silva, M. Grancieri, H. G. Lúcio, V. P. Venâncio, S. U. M. Talcott, C. O. B. Rosa, H. S. D. Martino, 23 January 2020 [PubMed] [Archive] ↩︎
  21. “Long-Term Dietary Intake of Chia Seed Is Associated with Increased Bone Mineral Content and Improved Hepatic and Intestinal Morphology in Sprague-Dawley Rats” – E. M. M. Chañi, S. O. S. Pacheco, G. A. Martínez, M. R. Freitas, J. G. Ivona, J. A. Ivona, W. J. Craig, F. J. Pacheco, 19 July 2018 [PubMed] [Archive] ↩︎

Last Updated on 4 months by D&C Editorial Team

About the Author

Christine has long been on the path to optimal health. With a history of weight loss coaching she is driven by a passion for nutrition, health and wellness. Having grown up in Africa before migrating to New Zealand, and then Australia, she has seen very strong contrasts in quality of life and is driven to help others understand the importance of taking a holistic approach to life.

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